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Working with Adolescents and their Technology


For Clinicians Only
 
 
Individual Workshop Tuition: $160 
Institute Members (Includes CEUs): $130 
Graduate Students and Candidates: $80 
 
 
Light refreshments are provided at each course, but you are welcome to bring a bag lunch or to walk to restaurants on Polk or Fillmore, or to Whole Foods on California & Franklin Streets (a 10 - 15 minute walk with hills). 
 
6 Possible Continuing Education Credits Approved for MD, PhD, LCSW, MFT & RN
 
This daylong workshop will examine psychological considerations in working with adolescents around their smartphones, computers, and video games: magical thinking, projective identification, and relational avoidance.
 
Morning Session
Faculty: Robert Tyminski, DMH
 
This course will explore many of the intense psychological states often appearing with various uses of technology among late adolescents. We will examine compulsive Internet use and video gaming, each of young men. Two cases will be presented for discussion of the psychic distortions around thinking and feeling, as these occurred in the analysis of a mid-adolescent boy and of another in later adolescence.
 
Facets of technology are now directly brought into our offices through smartphones and tablet computer. How do we handle these when they appear? We will discuss how they can be forms of communication, as well as resistance or refusal to relate to us as a potentially helfpful psychotherapist. Some of the ideas to explore in dialogue with one another will be the effects on relationships-including the therapeutic one-of these technologies. Examples might include magical thinking , an avoidant attitude toward relating, excessive projective identification, and a lack of psychic containment. Immersive use, perhaps even with addictive parts, of cell phones, social media, and the Internet may be bringing into our psychotherapy and analytic practices new kinds of challenges about the therapeutic frame, alliance, and interpersonal communication. Our discussion will also touch upon obvious ways in which using the Internet, social media, and video gaming can be beneficial for connecting with others, for creating new platforms of expression, and for education.
 
ROBERT TYMINSKI, DMH is an adult and child analyst member of the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco and its current President; he also teaches in the Institute’s analytic training program. He is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California at San Francisco. His recent book is The Psychology of Theft and Loss: Stolen and Fleeced, and was published in 2014 by Routledge
 
Afternoon Session: 
Faculty: Patricia Speier, MD
 
Being able to text has become a major rite of passage into adolescence in our culture today, and for most teens, cell phones seem like necessary extensions of themselves. The electronically enhanced world, though, is changing our brains, and how we relate. 
 
We are all participants in the largest brain-changing experiment since the printing press. In this seminar, two cases will be presented in which discussing texts became a major space for reflection and enhanced interpersonal understanding. Other vignettes will examine texting's destructive capabilities, breaking down the development of meaning and how screens effect mood, anxiety, and learning. 
 
PATRICIA L. SPEIER, MD, is a Child, Adolescent and Adult Analyst member of the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco. She is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Speier teaches both locally and nationally on play therapy and the treatment of anxiety and depression in children and adolescents. She also gives workshops on creativity for adults. She has a private practice in Berkeley and San Francisco, California.
Date: 06/18/16
Time: 10:00 AM - 04:30 PM

Date: Jun 18, 2016 10:00 AM - 04:30 AM

CE Hours

6.00

Activity Type

  • Extended Education

Accreditation(s)

Institute for Medical Quality - Continuing Medical

Accreditation(s)

 
The C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco is accredited by the Institute for Medical Quality/California Medical Association (IMQ/CMA) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
 
Clinical psychologists are also eligible to receive CME credit, which is accepted by the APA and the California Board of Psychology. 
 
The C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco designates this live activity for a maximum of 6.00 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™  Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate  with the extent of their participation in the activity.

 
   
 
Requirements for CE Credit
Attendance plus, completed evaluation and post-test.  Post test and evaluation must be completed to receive CEUs.
 
Support
The presentation was NOT underwritten or supported by commercial entitties. 
The California Board of Behavioral Sciences
The C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco is accredited by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (PCE 343) to provide continuing education for Marriage and Family Therapists and/or Licensed Clinical Social Workers for courses through June 2017

Requirements for CE Credit

Credit issued after online evaluation and questionairre completed. 

 

 

Registration closes on Jun 18, 2016 at 12:00 AM

Registration Closed  

SATURDAY, JUNE 18, 2016
10:00 AM – 4:30 PM
LOCATION: THE INSTITUTE 
FACULTY: PATRICIA SPEIER, MD; ROBERT TYMINSKI, DMH
6 Continuing Education Credits Approved for MD, PhD, LCSW, MFT & RN
 
This daylong workshop will examine psychological considerations in working with adolescents around their smartphones, computers, and video games: magical thinking, projective identification, and relational avoidance.
 
Morning Session
Faculty: Robert Tyminski, DMH
 
This course will explore many of the intense psychological states often appearing with various uses of technology among late adolescents. We will examine compulsive Internet use and video gaming, each of young men. Two cases will be presented for discussion of the psychic distortions around thinking and feeling, as these occurred in the analysis of a mid-adolescent boy and of another in later adolescence.
 
Facets of technology are now directly brought into our offices through smartphones and tablet computer. How do we handle these when they appear? We will discuss how they can be forms of communication, as well as resistance or refusal to relate to us as a potentially helfpful psychotherapist. Some of the ideas to explore in dialogue with one another will be the effects on relationships-including the therapeutic one-of these technologies. Examples might include magical thinking , an avoidant attitude toward relating, excessive projective identification, and a lack of psychic containment. Immersive use, perhaps even with addictive parts, of cell phones, social media, and the Internet may be bringing into our psychotherapy and analytic practices new kinds of challenges about the therapeutic frame, alliance, and interpersonal communication. Our discussion will also touch upon obvious ways in which using the Internet, social media, and video gaming can be beneficial for connecting with others, for creating new platforms of expression, and for education.
 
ROBERT TYMINSKI, DMH is an adult and child analyst member of the C. G. Jung Institute of San Francisco and its current President; he also teaches in the Institute’s analytic training program. He is a Clinical Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California at San Francisco. His recent book is The Psychology of Theft and Loss: Stolen and Fleeced, and was published in 2014 by Routledge
 
Afternoon Session: 
Faculty: Patricia Speier, MD
 
Being able to text has become a major rite of passage into adolescence in our culture today, and for most teens, cell phones seem like necessary extensions of themselves. The electronically enhanced world, though, is changing our brains, and how we relate. 
 
We are all participants in the largest brain-changing experiment since the printing press. In this seminar, two cases will be presented in which discussing texts became a major space for reflection and enhanced interpersonal understanding. Other vignettes will examine texting's destructive capabilities, breaking down the development of meaning and how screens effect mood, anxiety, and learning. 
 
PATRICIA L. SPEIER, MD, is a Child, Adolescent and Adult Analyst member of the C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco. She is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Speier teaches both locally and nationally on play therapy and the treatment of anxiety and depression in children and adolescents. She also gives workshops on creativity for adults. She has a private practice in Berkeley and San Francisco, California.
Date: 06/18/16
Time: 10:00 AM - 04:30 PM

CE Hours

6.00

Fee

$160.00

Location

C.G. Jung Institute of San Francisco